Connecticut Biomass Plant Converts Construction Waste to Energy

What to do with the mounds of construction debris that clog up about 30% of our nation’s landfills?

The best option is to recycle them as many LEED-certified buildings do, but turning local, hard-to recycle materials into energy is also a good option as this Connecticut project will.

We’re not crazy about growing plants specifically for energy, such as switchgrass or willow trees, especially considering recent research, so a plant being built in Plainfield, Connecticut is a better option – it will convert readily available construction and demolition (C&D) debris, recycled wood pallets, and land clearing materials in to energy.

Plainfield Renewable Energy is building a $225 million plant on a brownfield (former Superfund site) that will generate 37.5 megawatts of energy, enough to power 37,000 homes. It should be operating at the end of 2013.

It’s being financed by SAIC (NYSE: SAI) and the Carlyle Group. SAIC is also providing engineering, procurement, and construction services for the project. 

Connecticut Light & Power will purchase the energy under a 15-year power purchase agreement.

"It will create 400 green jobs, bring more than $800,000 per year of tax revenues to the town, and increase the supply of electricity to the region. It represents exactly the type of renewable energy projects that the state should attract," says Town of Plainfield First Selectman Paul Sweet.

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Comments on “Connecticut Biomass Plant Converts Construction Waste to Energy”

  1. Jen

    Burning up perfectly recyclable materials is not sustainable. Nor is it renewable energy.

    Incineration creates toxic emissions and ash.

    Incineration also furthers the throw-away mindset that encourage inefficiency and poor product design.

    Reply
  2. Jeff

    How can I get a job at the new Plainfield energy plant ?
    I now work at c&m corp. 30 years now and would like to work in the new plant please send me any information to help me make this possible . Thank u

    Reply
  3. The Neighbors

    Gee- we are so excited to live next to this monstrosity! This plant is noisy, smelly, has overly bright lighting, disruptive, and is ruining our air quality! Our home values are plummeting, not that I would, in good conscience sell this home to anyone else who would have to breathe this air. I think that those who think it is so wonderful, should move their families here. This is not a plant that should be built near any homes or residential areas. This is terrible!!!

    Reply
  4. A Sweet follower

    In reviewing the Political debate between Sweet and Cunningham who were both running for the seem position as First Selectman Paul Sweet was quoted as being totally against this plant being built. He made some very harsh comments about its approval by what I reviewed. Seems he’s riding Cunningham’s hard work and now taking credit for it. A true politician.

    Reply

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