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04/20/2011 10:10 AM     print story email story  

Philips Launches Energy Efficient Incandescent Bulb

SustainableBusiness.com News

Philips Lighting (NYSE: PHG) is launching a new line of incandescent light bulbs designed to meet federal energy efficiency standards that will take force in the US over the next few years.

While not as efficient as compact fluorescent or LED bulbs,  EcoVantage bulbs will likely appeal to people who are unhappy with the quality of light delivered by the more energy efficient technologies.

The new bulbs, which use halogen elements, provide energy savings of about 28% compared to conventional incandescents. That meets or exceeds efficiency standards established in the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. Wattage options are as follows:

29-watt replaces a 40-watt incandescent
43-watt replaces a 60-watt incandescent
72-watt replaces a 100-watt incandescent

By comparison, Philips also offers the AmbientLED line, which includes a 12.5 watt, ENERGY STAR qualified LED alternative to the 60 watt incandescent bulb. Those bulbs are said to reduce energy use by up to 80%.

According to the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA), lighting alone accounts for 22% of electricity use in the US, and there are over 4.4 billion medium screw-based light sockets.

The new EcoVantage bulbs will be available exclusively at Home Depot.

"EcoVantage can offer the same light quality and features as a traditional light bulb, because it is an incandescent," said Ed Crawford, General Manager of Lamps for Philips Lighting North America. "Using halogen technology, EcoVantage can offer added energy-efficiency and cost savings, without sacrificing any aesthetic features."

Meanwhile, the Philips plant in Sparta, Tennessee - the area's largest employer - is planning to close in early 2012.  The plant, which makes flourescent lights, has been operating there since 1963, withstanding the challenge of foreign competition.

Website: www.philips.com



Reader Comments (6)

Author:
Roger Agnoli

Date Posted:
04/20/11 08:35 PM

Dear Phillips Moving a plant in Tennessee is not an American move in the right direction. The loss of jobs here in our USA has been life changing. Let me buy USA made in Tennessee or other US plant to make your light shine . I can and will dim your profits a little by buying non Phillips Products if I find that your moving Plants outside the US !!!! Please stay here, better workers you can't find in any other country !! Thank you Roger Agnoli

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Author:
Robert

Date Posted:
05/12/11 10:09 PM

The incandescant light can be managed much more efficiently than they are doing. I do not think this I know it...uisng sound frequencies to manage the electron flow...DC electrical system...what is used for heat...can then be reclaimed to return line to battery storage...the filament never goes through the shock of on and off...making it last hundreds of hours longer...if not thousands. In AC systems...the nuetral wire completes the circuit...and it goes to earth ground... totally wasted electrical energy... Keeps that meter turning for the power company.

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Author:
Mari

Date Posted:
05/16/11 06:39 PM

WHY in the WORLD are they only available at Home Depot?

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Author:
mb

Date Posted:
09/13/12 05:45 PM

These make a very nice light! Bright and clear but warm, not the horrible CFL type of light. I see it is LED based technology. Maybe that's why. Very nice!

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Author:
mb

Date Posted:
09/13/12 05:45 PM

(btw, I got the clear bulb.)

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Author:
mb

Date Posted:
09/13/12 05:46 PM

And it was the 72W, 100W equiv.

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